What makes a customer read your leaflet?

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

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What makes a customer read your leaflet?

I see it so many times when I’m out and about shopping… a pile of leaflets in a cafe or shop. It has obviously been designed in Word, they’ve slapped on some contact details (sometimes corrected afterwards with a biro) and printed on a home printer with maybe a few smudge marks here and there. Usually this is because they have panicked… the business may have just started up, looking to expand, or even, in these times they may be finding business is getting a little tougher, and suddenly they realise they need to advertise more, and think the faster they get them out the better. But ask yourself, if your message isn’t properly thought about, and the design is slap-dash, what would make me want to pick that leaflet up? Why should I take an interest in your business, if you can’t even take the time to make an effort to grab my attention?

We all know the saying ‘you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover’ and this is true, but sadly so many of us (including myself) do often fall for this error! I mean, the service you are advertising may even be something I’m interested in, but you haven’t grabbed my attention enough to look closer and make a connection. And have you thought about if I am even the right type of audience you want to to be reading the leaflet? For example, wheres the point handing out leaflets advertising your nursery school to a retirement community? Work out who your main customer base is, and where you are most likely to grab their attention.

The important thing to remember is, it doesn’t matter how many leaflets you send out, what matters is the return you get back from them.. so why not increase the chances of a return as much as you can?

If you need any help with your next marketing campaign, whether it be a leaflet, poster or flyer, just give us a call on 0116 232 5931 and we would be happy to discuss this further with you.

Good luck!

Jenni

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

Things to consider when creating a website

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Things to consider when creating a website

A website is an important tool for any businesses when it comes to communicating to existing clients and attracting prospective ones too; it needs to be well organised & dynamic. Carefully planning your pages even before you get started can help to ensure that your finished website looks great.

Firstly think about the number of pages to your website and what you want to go on them.
Below are some basic pages most companies use in their website;

  • Home Page – The homepage is one of the most important pages on a website, and gets more page views than any other page. (It’s your companies face to the world). Remember, potential customers will look at your company’s online presence before doing business with you — regardless of whether they plan to close the actual sale online.
  • About Us – This page is a great opportunity to tell your readers all about your business. Add a bit if personality, tell them how the company started and you could even give a small snippet on your staff. People love to read more about the people they are dealing with.
  • Services –  Promote what you do and give your clients the opportunity to check out how you could help them. Again it gives them this information easily as some clients prefer this than having to call or email. If they then like what they see, they are more likely to get in touch further.
  • Contact Page – Filling out a form is just a quicker way for them to get in touch. Add your contact details, even if they are elsewhere on your site have it here too. You must make it as easy as possible for people to be able to contact you.
  • Blog – It allows you to have a human face and voice. As much as you’d like to use an informal tone or a friendly voice on your website, there are times when you just can’t. A company blog is the place where you can easily adopt a more human stance. It is also great for optimising your site for Google. By keeping your site up to date with a blog it makes your website current.

Once you know what pages you need, simply gather all the content for each section, text, images & logos etc. We find it very useful here to use a template to write the content. Please feel free to download ours here as a starting point.

And finally, most important is making sure you know your audience before writing your content. Your language would be different for children than it would adults, and similarly there’s a strong difference between business & consumer.
If you require any advice regarding your website, give us a call on 0116 281 57321 or email hello@yourhyphen.co.uk

I hope this has been useful
Terri

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

Why does my logo not look sharp?

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Why does my logo not look sharp?

Have you ever wondered why you or someone else’s logo doesn’t look sharp in print when the rest of the print looks good? The likely answer to this will be the file format. If the logo has been saved in, what we refer to as a pixel format, and has been saved at a resolution lower than the required print size then it will print pixelated and fuzzy. Because I see this happen so often, I thought I’d explain what pixel files are and also the preferred Vector format.
What are pixel based files?
Pixel (aka bitmap or jpeg) based images are those made up of pixels (dots) and are resolution dependent.  The number of pixels in an image is linked to the resolution setting (dpi – dots per square inch) to make up the file size. In print the ideal size for a pixel file is 300 to 450dpi at the size that the file is being printed. If the file is 50x100mm at 300dpi then that is the maximum size it should be printed at. If you enlarge the file to say 100x200mm that will reduce the resolution to 150dpi which will degrade the image making it “look pixelated”.

Pixel files are ideal for photographs but they can be used convert vector files when the vector file is just too detailed or complicated, which may result in crashing the print job.
Typical pixel files – jpeg, tiff, gif, png

What are vector based files?
Vector files are scalable to any size allowing you to make the file as large as you like and it will still look perfect. A vector image can easily be converted to a pixel file, however the reverse conversion is not so straight forward and can be very time consuming to do so. This is why most logos should be designed in a vector format and not in a pixel format.

Typical vector files – ai and eps files however please be aware that it is possible to place a pixel file within these formats and save them as ai or eps. Also a PDF can be either vector or pixel formats, it all depends again on what is within the file.

View an example

So the answer to the question “why does my logo not look sharp in print” is most likely that it has been saved as a pixel file with the resolution lower than the size required to be printed at. To prevent this, make sure you have a vector version of your logo and that your printer prints it in the vector format and doesn’t convert it to a pixel format without telling you.

If you would like to know more or you would like us to check your logo then please call me on 0116 281 5730

Jason

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

Choosing the best type of website for your business – part 3

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Choosing the best type of website for your business – part 3

So far in this series we’ve discussed two great platforms to build your website on – Brochure websites and Content Managed Systems. However, in the last part to the series, I want to look into the most comprehensive and powerful web tool a business can have.

An online shop or e-Commerce website can give your company a leading edge and a gateway for your clients to interact and use. Depending on what you are selling this type of website can require very little maintenance and can be like having another side to your business. Things like payments and products can be automated, plus you can set up the site to work with any systems you may already use, leaving you to get on with other things and deal with new orders when they come in or when products change.

However, this type of system is not perfect for every business. Even though most companies sell something it does depend on volume and how you sell your product. Before deciding on an online shop there are some important things to consider.

Firstly, consider the size of your business. Although it is not essential to be a big company to have an online shop its important to realise that an e-commerce site can be a big financial strain on the company and for start up businesses. Like I mentioned earlier, it’s like having a whole other side to the business.

Secondly, what are you selling? If your a hairdresser then this platform may not be for you! However that doesn’t mean that you couldn’t use a system to create an online appointment service. So there can always be a use for an online system that may make it more enjoyable and useful for your clients.

Thirdly, does your site require payments online? If so, then it’s also useful to be aware that there can be additional costs to make your website secure. SSL Ceritificates protect users by making sensitive data such as credit card details, names and addresses unreadable to hackers, but they can cost extra money depending on the level of security you need.

Finally, get a reliable website provider with good support. Having a genius bedroom designer create your e-commerce site for you on the cheap might seem like a great idea but if something goes wrong or you need to change a fundamental aspect, the last thing you want is for your developer to be unavailable especially when a sale is on the line.

Online shops are becoming increasingly popular due to their flexibility and low maintenance. Some businesses nowadays have even resorted to ditching the store front and operating purely online meaning that the internet store is there only communication to the public.

If you are still not sure which type of website is for you, or you just need help in this area feel free to contact me on 0116 232 5931.

Rich

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

Choosing the best type of website for your business – part 2

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Choosing the best type of website for your business – part 2

Last time I discussed a bit about brochure websites to try to help you understand the characteristics of a static site what the key features are and the pros and cons of them. These sites are perfect for smaller or start-up organisations that need a web presence. However if you want something that is dynamic and needs to be updated frequently then a Content Management System could be for you.

CMS websites are becoming increasingly popular and often use platforms such as WordPress, Joomla or Megento to name a few.

Some of the advantages of using these systems are;

  • You can update your site anywhere with internet access
  • Often has a friendly user interface that makes it easy to add and edit content for non web experts
  • Add as many pages as you need from a variety of page templates
  • Regular updates are good for Search Engine Optimisation and increasing traffic to your site

So what are the cons of using this system?

  • They require more complex coding and configuration to set up.
  • Free templates are available but are often restricting in what you can do with them so customisation may be required
  • Larger number of files means more difficult to move the website if transferring to another provider

Try to think in the long run when deciding on your website because even if you think you won’t need to ever change it, if circumstances change it can cost more getting your web design company to do them or rejig your site to add the functionality to edit yourselves.

Next week will be the last part to this series and will be talking about an online shop or e-commerce website allowing you to manage products, deal with payments and accounts!

Till next time.

Rich

What makes a customer read your leaflet?

Why are business cards so important?

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Why are business cards so important?

If you have ever had to go without business cards for any substantial amount of time, you’ll appreciate just how valuable they can be.  Your business card is the first impression anyone sees of your organisation.  We all have been asked dozens of times “Do you have a card?”, and when we don’t, we know how embarrassing it can be getting a pen and paper out to write your details on.

Once you’ve handed your business card out to your clients you may be asking yourself the question; what do they think about my business? Every aspect of the card can influence how they perceive you and your organisation. The creative design/branding on the card, the quality of the logo, readability, and finally the “feel” of the card. All of these can influence how they will react.

Your cards should state your name, phone number, organisation, position, and any other relevant contact information. Providing a business card ensures that acquaintances will remember your name, whilst making them feel comfortable with contacting you in the future, since most professionals give out business cards as a means of opening the lines of communication.

“Branding is about positioning, living a promise & creating a relationship with your customer :Marketingspot”

Business cards are a necessity, and a socially accepted way of introducing yourself politely to a new or prospective client. It express’s you and your organisation and plays an important role long after presenting that initial card to your client.

If you are unsure what your business cards say about your organisation call us on 0116 232 5931 and we would be happy to help.

I hope this has been useful

Terri